WRITING ABOUT BIGFOOT: A TRICKY PROPOSITION, a guest post by Patrick C. Greene


Back when I first conceived of my novel Progeny, I realized there were potential pitfalls. I had in fact, been warned away from the topic.  
As it happened the guy who issued the warning was less-than-knowledgeable on the subject of both mythical monsters and apparently, despite being a screenwriter, about writing in general. He asserted that no one cares about bigfoot. Seeing dozens of books and movies hitting the markets every month that featured the hairy monster, I was sure he was at least partially wrong.
In the early going, whenever people asked what the book was about, I tended to be furtive in telling them, preferring to emphasize the human elements, as I did in writing it. But after the first few conversations, I realized just how wrong my "friend" had been. These days, when people ask, I can just respond "Bigfoot" and the interest level is instant and palpable.
My point: writing is a very personal thing, and if you are interested in a topic that's all the reason you need to write about it. That's no guarantee of success of course—unless you measure success the way I do, which is first and foremost based on how much I enjoy writing about something. Friends and family members generally mean well when offering advice about writing. But even if they are writers, it doesn't mean their advice is good. In the famous words of William Goldman: "No one knows anything."

Author Bio
Some dark serendipity plopped a young Patrick Greene in front of a series of ever stranger films-and experiences-in his formative years, leading to a unique viewpoint. His odd interests have led to pursuits in film acting, paranormal investigation, martial arts, quantum physics, bizarre folklore and eastern philosophy. These elements flavor his screenplays and fiction works, often leading to strange and unexpected detours designed to keep viewers and readers on their toes.
Literary influences range from Poe to Clive Barker to John Keel to a certain best-selling Bangorian. Suspense, irony, and outrageously surreal circumstances test the characters who populate his work, taking them and the reader on a grandly bizarre journey into the furthest realms of darkness. The uneasy notion that reality itself is not only relative but indeed elastic- is the hallmark of Greene’s writing.
Living in the rural periphery of Asheville North Carolina with his wife, youngest son Gavin and an ever-growing army of cats, Greene still trains in martial arts when he’s not giving birth to demons via his pen and keyboard.

Links:
Amazon buy link: http://www.amazon.com/Progeny-ebook/dp/B009U6VFEK/ref=sr_1_1_bnp_1_kin?ie=UTF8&qid=1366910642&sr=8-1&keywords=progeny
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