Friday, June 10, 2016

Interview with Alexis Georg Hoen, author of Christianity and Cosmic Consciousness


Title: Christianity and Cosmic Consciousness
Author: Alexis Georg Hoen
Publisher: iUniverse
Genre: Religion
Format: Ebook

Born in the Ukraine, educated in Munich, and having practiced medicine in the United States, author Alexis Georg Hoen has been exposed to widely differing political systems and religious beliefs, and he has always maintained an interest as to the origin of these beliefs and their relation to the innermost nature of man. In Christianity and Cosmic Consciousness, he interprets the words and the sacrifice of Jesus as pointing the way toward a realization of our innermost nature—the will to live and love that exists within all.

Sharing his experiences and ideas about Christ’s words and sacrifice, Hoen uses personal anecdotes and biblical examples to illustrate the nature of Christian belief. He provides a host of examples, including key illustrations from the Bible and relevant source material from other writers who address this topic. He shows us that through sacrifice we live in and for others. That is eternal life.

Christianity and Cosmic Consciousness represents the core of Christian teaching without resorting to the supernatural and miraculous, yet doesn’t try to disprove it.

Could you please tell us a little about your book? 

The essential thoughts in my book are as follows: The innermost nature of all that exists, be it molecules, rocks, plants or animals, conscious or not is the divine principle of creative advance into novelty, a term coined by Alfred North Whitehead. In simpler terms, our common innermost nature is the need and the power to create and to love the creatures. This is also the essence of the Divine Principle, of God. Therefore, we are all children and representatives of God , and the difference between every one of us and Jesus is merely a quantitative one. In addition to the positive principle of creative advance everything contains the negative principle of death and destruction without which the positive principle (God) could not manifest itself. Evil is real and necessary. Support of creation, of Being in general, implies love of the creatures and yet Being in general can only be manifested by individual beings that are necessarily in some way opposed to each other. I occupy space no one else can occupy, in order to eat I have to destroy. I am a part and apart at the same time. This our "original fault," not some sort of an original sin inherited from Adam. The realization of our innermost nature, co-extensive with that of the universe for the duration of time conveys a sense of immortality. Through sacrifice for others we live in them and through them. This is symbolized by the death and resurrection of}esus, be it historical or not. Jesus's words teach us the truths stated above.

Who or what is the inspiration behind this book?

I had the opportunity to express the thoughts I outlined above, and it was well received. Thus I decided my views may be of interest to a larger number of listeners.

What cause are you most passionate about and why? 

I am most passionate about life because that is what everyone, including myself, clings to according to his or her nature. I am trying to find a way to live beyond myself whether there is some kind of life after death or not.

Do you have any rituals you follow when you finish a piece of work?

No ritual.

Who has influenced you throughout your writing career?

I cannot say that any one person has particularly influenced the development of my thoughts but talking to my children has helped to solidify them. My deceased wife taught me the meaning of love. In terms of philosophy I have been most influenced by Alfred North Whitehead.

What are some of your long term goals?

My goal is to have as many people as possible see things my way.

Alexis Georg Hoen attended medical school in Munich. He immigrated to the United States at age twenty-five, and he practiced medicine in Los Angeles for fifty years. In addition to the study of religion, he enjoys gardening and spending time with his three children and six grandchildren.

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